Author Archives: Kyle Medin

Police Manuals

Attorneys may find it useful to review police procedure manuals to understand the applicable rules of conduct for the relevant law enforcement entity in their case. These rules are referred to as “policies and procedures,” “general orders,” “general directives,” “codes of conduct,” or “manuals.” Many police departments across the state have their manuals available for public viewing online, though the manuals for the various county sheriffs’ offices seem to be less commonly available.

In many cases, police departments and sheriffs’ offices choose to pursue accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA), which requires compliance with certain standards and annual review. General information on the accreditation process and standards can be found here. It is likely that a CALEA-accredited department would have written standards.

The following is a non-exhaustive list of the law enforcement entities in the most highly-populated areas of the state, with links to online manuals if they are available. Even if the manuals have not been made available online, many law enforcement entities have made reference to such manuals in documents that are publicly available, so attorneys could request them through discovery or through a public records request.

Police Departments

Sheriffs’ Offices

  • Buncombe – Unavailable.
  • Cabarrus – Unavailable, though adhering to the “Sheriff’s Procedures and Policies” is listed as a goal in an office document (page 239).
  • Cumberland – Doesn’t list manual, but is CALEA accredited.
  • Forsyth – Doesn’t list manual, but is CALEA accredited.
  • Guilford – Unavailable.
  • Iredell – no manual available for the sheriff’s office, but the Forensic Services Guide is available here.
  • Johnston – Unavailable, but code of ethics available online.
  • Mecklenburg – Unavailable.
  • New Hanover – Unavailable.
  • Onslow – Unavailable.
  • Scotland – Unavailable.
  • Union – Unavailable.
  • Wake – Unavailable, though a portion of an old version is available here
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Sexual Assault Kit Tracking Now Available

In 2018, the NC General Assembly passed legislation (S.L. 2018-70) requiring the creation of the a statewide tracking system to track the testing of Sexual Assault Evidence Collection Kits (SAECKs) from collection to completion of forensic testing. The tracking system is now available for all stakeholders in the criminal justice system.

For kits collected on or after Oct. 1, 2018, the Sexual Assault Evidence Collection Kit Tracking and Information Management System (STIMS), can be accessed to know where the kit is, in whose custody, whether the kit has reached the lab, and whether or not it has been tested—useful information for all participants in the investigation and court proceedings.

The system is easy to use: just visit the STIMS online portal, enter the serial number of the kit you wish to check in the system, and the tracking information will be returned in moments. The serial number of the kit is found on the box itself. The number may contain several leading zeroes—these may be included or omitted. Defense counsel will need to request the serial number of the kit from law enforcement or the District Attorney’s Office. Attorneys should be aware that the online system does not report the results of the testing, only the tracking information. Results of laboratory analysis are available through the discovery process.

The NC Attorney General’s Office has put together a series of instructional videos on the STIMS systems for various users:

Overview: A general overview of STIMS, why it was created, as well as applicable law and legislative history.

Survivor User: Covers how to enter the serial numbers and how to read the results page.

These videos may be useful to know how the data is entered and how the kits are tracked through the chain of custody:

Law Enforcement User Training Video

Crime Laboratory User Training Video

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